Psycho Sausage – The Multiple Personalities of Chorizo

 

Did you know there are two Chorizo’s out there?  There’s Spanish, and there’s Mexican.  Most recipes won’t tell you which to use – you need to understand the origin of the dish to select accurately.

 

Spanish Chorizo looks like a pepperoni or summer sausage, because it is dry cured like they are.  It is made with Sweet Paprika (there are two types of Paprika as well!!) and can be eaten sliced right from the “stick”.  You would use this in Paella, for instance.

 

Mexican Chorizo, even though it can come in a casing, has the consistency of bulk sausage and contains more fat.  It is seasoned more with chiles and vinegar.  You need to cook Mexican Chorizo – either in the casing or squeezed out of the casing – just like you would ground beef or bulk sausage.

 

At Lula’s for Lunch…and More! Catering we use Mexican Chorizo in our South American Strata, and it’s DEElicious!!  Or, ask for our Texi-Mexi Empanadas – served with our amazing Avocado-Cilantro Crème.

 

 

Purple Potatoes

These gemlike spuds are about as big as a Ping-Pong ball, but don’t let their size fool you. Purple Potaotes have many times the antioxidant power of their cousins, white and yellow potatoes. Studies have found that the plant pigments that give them their lovely color, called anthocyanins, may improve memory and prevent age-related muddled thinking. Also, their high levels of folate help lower levels of the amino acid homocysteine, which can damage brain cells. Pretty good for such a tiny tater.  Look for them in your produce section – they’re not as hard to get as they used to be!  Lula’s for Lunch…and More! Catering uses them not only because they’re healthy and beautiful, but because they TASTE so good.  You can see a description of them here  as Banderillas

Mulberries are Here!

Please enjoy another post about deliciousness and nutrition from my friend Heidi Bright :

Here we go ’round the mulberry bush, The mulberry bush, The mulberry bush. Here we go ’round the mulberry bush so early in the morning.

-English nursery rhyme

I grew up hearing this song and assumed mulberries grew on bushes, like raspberries and blueberries.

Nope. They grow on trees. My sister and I discovered this two summers ago on Long Island, where we saw a man picking what looked like long raspberries off a tree. A tree? What was he eating?  Mulberries.

Oh, we crammed our mouths with their luscious juiciness until we couldn’t reach any more. So sweet, so ripe, and no exterior seeds.

This past week my friend Laura and I took a walk and she identified a mulberry tree. I didn’t know they grew in the Cincinnati area. We filled a bag with what we could reach.

When we met again, she arrived holding a bag filled with fresh, ripe mulberries she had picked. What a treat! And then we found more. I’m in mulberry heaven.

Fortunately, mulberries have great nutritional value. According to https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/mulberries.html, they can improve digestion, reduce cholesterol, aid in weight loss, increase circulation, build bone tissues, boost the immune system, prevent certain cancers, slow down the aging process, decrease blood pressure, protect eyes, and improve metabolism.

That’s a pretty nice list of benefits. Makes me want to go ‘round a mulberry tree and pick more. Just need a ladder to catch those ones up high…

Thriver Soup Ingredient: To find mulberries, check your local farmers’ markets or look for dried varieties in stores. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/mulberries.html includes nutrition facts. Research on “Composition of anthocyanins in mulberry and their antioxidant activity” Look up effects of mulberry extracts before considering using them.

The Sodom of Sodium (get it?!?)

I don’t know about you, but my body retains more sodium (and everything else) in summer rather than the cooler months when our metabolisms run at a faster rate.  Your body NEEDS sodium – you cannot live without it.  BUT you really shouldn’t consume more than 1500 milligrams per day or it can turn into a BAD thing.  Sodium can go by a number of names, including salt, sodium benzoate, disodium or monosodium glutamate. .  Read labels and be aware!  To help you, here are some foods high in sodium, and below THAT are some alternatives.

  • Foods that are pickled (unless they come from Lula’s for Lunch…and More! Catering ) !! like the Tarragon Sherry pickles in the pic above
  • Foods that are smoked  (unless they come from Lula’s for Lunch…and More! Catering ) !!  like the Smoked Trout in the pic above
  • Condiments, such as soy sauce, teriyaki sauce, cocktail sauce and ketchup
  • Prepared salad dressing (Lula’s are homemade so no worries!)
  • Foods served in a broth or with au jus
  • Some cereals
  • Meat, poultry or seafood that has been enhanced with a sodium solution (virtually ALL pre-cut, prepackaged protein)
  • Canned beans
  • Canned tomatoes
  • Processed cheeses, such as American
  • Spice mixes that have salt in them

Citrus is one of my favorite ways to enhance flavor.  Also, don’t forget that many prepared foods now come in low and no sodium varieties – always buy these, and add the extra tidbit of salt you may desire, OR,  here are some more ways to use spices and herbs in place of sodium:

  • Basil: Fish, lamb, lean ground meats, stews, salads, soups, sauces, fish cocktails
  • Chives: Salads, sauces, soups, lean meat dishes, vegetables
  • Cinnamon: Fruits (especially apples), breads, pie crusts
  • Curry powder: Lean meats (especially lamb), veal, chicken, fish, tomatoes, tomato soup, mayonnaise
  • Dill: Fish sauces, soups, tomatoes, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower, green beans, cucumbers, potatoes, salads, macaroni, lean beef, lamb, chicken, fish
  • Garlic (not garlic salt): Lean meats, fish, soups, salads, vegetables, tomatoes, potatoes
  • Ginger: Chicken, fruits
  • Mustard (dry): Lean ground meats, lean meats, chicken, fish, salads, asparagus, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, mayonnaise, sauces
  • Nutmeg: Fruits, pie crust, lemonade, potatoes, chicken, fish, lean meat loaf, toast, veal, pudding, ANYTHING with cream in it – savory OR sweet
  • Onion powder (not onion salt): Lean meats, stews, vegetables, salads, soups
  • Paprika: Lean meats, fish, soups, salads, sauces, vegetables
  • Parsley: Lean meats, fish, soups, salads, sauces, vegetables
  • Peppermint extract: Puddings, fruits
  • Rosemary: Chicken, veal, lean meat loaf, lean beef, lean pork, sauces, stuffings, potatoes, peas, lima beans
  • Sage: Lean meats, stews, biscuits, tomatoes, green beans, fish, lima beans, onions, lean pork
  • Thyme: Lean meats (especially veal and lean pork), sauces, soups, onions, peas, tomatoes, salads
  • Turmeric: Lean meats, fish, sauces, rice

AND…the #1 way to reduce sodium in your diet – DON’T PUT SALT ON THE DINNER TABLE!  I’ve gotta tell ya’ – NOTHING is more insulting to a cook than salting something before you’ve tasted it!

Here’s to your health, and your joy! -Lula